Tryptophan Benefits

trytophan,health benefits,alternative health,nutrition,how to get to sleep,lack of sleep,depression,insomniaTryptophan is one of the essential amino acids that must be acquired from diet, and you may be familiar with it because turkey is one of the best sources of it. Tryptophan is also known to affect the brain neurotransmitter serotonin and is a precusor to serotonin. It is also needed to create vitamin B3 and the hormone melatonin. In fact, without tryptophan you would be unable to control your sleep cycles, pain, or moods.

Tryptophan sources are available from both animal and plant-based foods, although animal-based foods usually contain more tryptophan than plant-based foods. If you’re curious about levels of tryptophan available in some foods, here’s the list:

Tryptophan Sources Based on a 200-calorie Serving

Food Tryptophan Level
Elk 746 mg
Spinach, raw 690 mg
Soy Protein Isolate 685 mg
Sesame Seed Flour 659 mg
Seaweed, Spirulina 641 mg
Alaskan King Crab 607 mg
Pork 571 mg
Caribou 549 mg
Lobster 515 mg
Turkey 509 mg
MORI-NU Tofu 505 mg
Rabbit, wild 505 mg
Tuna Fish in water 493 mg
Chicken 475 mg
Sunflower Seed Flour 451 mg
Crimini Mushrooms 415 mg
Turnip Greens 400 mg
Cottage Cheese 381 mg
Cream Cheese 347 mg
Mozarella Cheese 343 mg
Basil 339 mg
Mustard Greens 333 mg
Asparagus 322 mg
Peanut Flour 310 mg
Kidney Beans 303 mg
Bamboo Shoots 291 mg
Oat Bran 285 mg
Amaranth Leaves 270 mg
Chicory Greens 270 mg
Mung Beans 267 mg

 

Tryptophan provides numerous health benefits. It is needed to prevent insomnia, and it increases your body’s levels of melatonin, which also aids in sleep. In addition, it increases a person’s pain threshold, thereby allowing a person to endure more pain. It may also help to improve moods and prevent depression, particularly the type of depression often observed in menopausal women. So, make sure you eat a variety of foods to enjoy the benefits derived from this essential amino acid.

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